How to escape from a plugged lie?

PGA Advanced Professional

How to escape from a plugged lie?

How to escape from a plugged lie?

How to escape from a plugged lie is a short golf blog post outlining the key points to success when faced with the so-called “Fried Egg”

Normal Bunker shot

When the ball finds the bunker, a player would normally think about the following points.

Take the desired club. This will vary due to the depth of the bunker and/or the distance involved.
Grip the club shorter.
Open up the clubface. This will introduce the bounce of the club which is very important to the success of the shot.
The stance should be wide and also open. (Aiming left to compensate for the open clubface).
Bury both feet into the sand for stability. Weight should be 75% on the left foot.
The ball position should be towards the left foot & the swing should be steeper than a pitch.
The follow through should be as long as possible.

Key points to escape the plugged lie

In the case of a fried egg the player should follow the points below.

Take a Sandwedge. Don’t get cocky, the main objective is to get the ball out of the bunker.
Grip the club at the normal length which will give you more power.
Close the Clubface. It should appear that the toe of the club is closer to the sand.
The stance should be wide and closed. (Aiming right to compensate for the closed clubface).
Bury both feet into the sand for stability. Weight should be 75% on the left foot.
The ball position should be further back in the stance to help create a steep impact.
There will be very little, if any, followthrough due to the steepness of the impact.
The main point is to be as aggressive as possible and as steep as possible.

There will be zero backspin on the ball. In fact there is very little control at all from a plugged lie.
The player should just be happy that the ball is out of the bunker.

 

What do you think of this golf blog post? Did you know any of the tricks?

Please leave a comment below or fill out the Contact Form.

To read more of my golf blog posts, click here.

Image by Kevin Phillips from Pixabay

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *